children-and-family

Top 10 Jewish Words to Teach Your Kids

Mon, 10/16/2017 - 12:00am
BY AMY DEUTSCH for Kveller


I love the way certain phrases, sounds, and words add up to a special family vocabulary. I’m pretty sure my kids think I don’t know the word “head” because I only ever call it by the Yiddish word keppe (especially when I’m giving it a kiss!). My husband’s go-to name for a pretend person is Chaim Yankel. My son has taken to calling me Ima instead of Mommy because it feels more special to him. All of these together create our own unique family language.

If you’re looking to add a few Jewish words to your family’s lexicon, look no further than this list, featuring my absolute favorite Jewish words.

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Origami Torah

Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:00am

From JTeach.org


Download the Origami Torah Instructions.
 

Citron Sun Catchers for Sukkot

Mon, 10/02/2017 - 12:00am

This article is featured in our Sukkot & Simchat Torah Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here.
 


By Brenda Ponnay for ToriAvey.com


The citron is a fragrant citrus fruit, similar to a lemon but with less pulpy juiciness. In Hebrew, it’s called an etrog. The citron is an ancient fruit. It has been used as a Jewish blessing since Biblical times, and it’s one of the Four Species for Sukkot that are mentioned in the Torah.

Citrons are not really used for food in their natural state– they are really dry and sour– but they are sometimes candied at the end of Sukkot and for Tu B’Shevat. Citrons are pretty rare, and can be somewhat difficult to obtain here in the states, so I thought it would be nice to represent the citron in a craft instead.  These are fun little sun catchers that would look really pretty decorating your sukkah. They’re also really easy to make!

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Humor Is Your Secret Parenting Weapon

Mon, 09/25/2017 - 12:00am
BY CARLA NAUMBURG for Kveller


Sometimes I put a pair of cotton princess underwear on my head before I wake up my daughters in the morning. Sometimes I recite their breakfast options in a ridiculous French accent. I smear bubbles across my face while I’m giving them a bath and tell them absurd stories about the day their father and I selected them from the discount rack at The Baby Store because that’s where babies come from.

I open my mouth to yell at them and end up launching myself across the living room with a loud TRA-LA-LAAAAA ala Captain Underpants. (Speaking of which, we do, in fact, make our fair share of Uranus jokes around here.) I activate Mommy Robot Procedures and make loud beeping noises while I press the moles on their arms to change them from Grumpy Mode to Happy Mode and, most nights around 5:30 PM, to Sit Your Tushy In The Chair and Eat Your Dinner Mode.

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Make a Shofar to Celebrate the Jewish New Year

Mon, 09/18/2017 - 12:00am
This article is featured in our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here

BY CINDY HOPPER for AlphaMom


Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, begins at sundown on Friday, September 18th and lasts through Sunday, September 20th.  During Rosh Hashanah a Shofar, traditionally made from a hollowed out rams horn, is blown to awake and inspire.  The Shofar is such an important part of this holiday that sometimes Rosh Hashanah is called Yom Teruah, which means “day of the Shofar blast” in Hebrew.

With a few supplies you can make your own Shofar horn. Gather 3 toilet paper rolls per horn, a party horn, masking tape, glue, paint brush, scissors and white and brown paint.

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Apple Cloud Dough

Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am

This project is featured in our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here


From Growing A Jeweled Rose


Cloud dough is such a fun sensory material, and it is so incredibly easy to make.  It is safe for kids of all ages too, which is always a bonus.  Today, we made a new batch of cloud dough perfect for Fall. 

And for the High Holidays.

Apple Cloud Dough Recipe
7 cups of flour
1 cup of vegetable oil 
Apple Pie Spice and/or cinnamon

Method
Combine the ingredients in a sensory bin or container and mix well.  That's it!  Couldn't be easier, right? 

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High Holiday Resources from Our Friends at jkidphilly

Mon, 09/11/2017 - 12:00am

This article is featured in our High Holiday Guide. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here


Rosh Hashanah occurs on the first and second days of the Jewish month of Tishri. In Hebrew, Rosh Hashanah means, literally, "head of the year" or "first of the year." Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish New Year. The celebration of this holiday is marked with both joy and solemnity, as it is the day on which the whole world is judged for the coming year.  Rosh Hashanah is the birthday of the world, as it was on this day that God created man on the 6th day of creation.

Print, color and mail Rosh Hashanah postcards to your family and friends!
Download and print our Rosh Hashanah info sheet
Rosh Hashanah Hannah and her friends on Shalom Sesame rock out the New Year on this video clip.
G-dcast presents Shofar Callin': The Rosh Hashanah Song  

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A Rosh Hashanah craft for kids that’s very sweet indeed

Mon, 09/04/2017 - 12:00am
This article is featured in our High Holiday Guide: Just for Kids section, it comes from CoolMomPicks. For more articles, recipes, crafts, and ideas, visit here. 



With Rosh Hashanah just around the corner, this is a perfect weekend to work on some New Year inspired crafts with your kids. In other words, if you’ve forgotten to send cards? No worries! Nothing inspires as much forgiveness as something handmade just from the kids.

This Rosh Hashanah craft for kids by Brenda Ponnay at Alpha Mom is as sweet as apples dipped in honey, the symbol of the Jewish New Year. It’s not hard to make these honeybee cards either if you follow the instructions on the site and have a few basic tools on hand, like paint, Sharpies, card stock, and bubble wrap.


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Best Rosh Hashanah Crafts for Kids

Mon, 08/28/2017 - 12:00am
From FamilyHoliday.net


Most people except Jewish usually don’t know what Rosh Hashanah is. Hanukkah for most of us, is the big Jewish holiday, and we know nothing about the other holidays. Rosh Hashanah – is the new year of the Jewish community, the first of the High Holidays or Yamim Noraim. Rosh Hashanah is extremely important in the Jewish faith, it represents either analogically or literally the creation of the World and stands for the feast of trumpets, freeing ourselves from all bad stuffs lurking inside us and wishing all a good and pious new year. This year, Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown on the first day of Tishrei, the first month of the Hebrew calendar, on the seventh month of the Jewish calendar, this year is on September. Rosh Hashanah Begins the ten-day period before Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. Thus, the Jewish New Year is right around the corner! Most preschool children love to do activities and crafts, so what better way to celebrate the coming Rosh Hashanah year traditions than through handmade activities. Here are some creative ideas to celebrate the holiday and the hectic holiday season.

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For more great ideas visit our High Holiday Kit. 

Jewish Parent/Child Relationships

Mon, 08/21/2017 - 12:00am
BY MJL STAFF


Jewish Parent/Child Relationships


Judaism commands us to respect our mothers and fathers — and provide for our children.


As with other human relationships, Jewish parents and their children (both adult and minor) are, in traditional Judaism, bound to each other by a series of commanded responsibilities and sacred practices. Most societies emphasize reverence for parents; post-biblical Judaism appears to have gone further than its contemporaries in mandating that parents provide for their children with very specific preparations for the future. Furthermore, Judaism sees parents and offspring as bound to each other not only for practical or humanistic reasons, but also as a way of honoring God.

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For Israeli kids, every day is independence day

Mon, 08/14/2017 - 12:00am
By Inbal Arieli for Israel21c


From the moment they can raise their heads, we encourage our sons and daughters to explore the world around them without fear or constraint.



People ask me all the time: “What makes Israel such a cradle of innovation?” or “Why are Israelis constantly busy with new initiatives?”


I have given these questions a lot of thought and quite frankly, I think it starts from the cradle.


Granted, I’m an Israeli mother, so perhaps I am a bit biased, but I think the answer to why Israel is such a laboratory of innovation and entrepreneurship begins with the way modern Israelis raise their children.


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Why Bother? A Religious School Manifesto

Mon, 08/07/2017 - 12:00am

By Rabbi Nicki Greninger on eJewishPhilanthropy



*This goes out to all parents thinking of sending their kids to a (Jewish) religious school… to parents who were raised Jewish, those who chose Judaism, and those who aren’t Jewish but married a Jew.*


In the last month, I’ve had several conversations that got me thinking. One friend asked a group of us who went to Jewish summer camp together (we are now grown up with kids of our own), “Are you going to send your kids to religious school?” In another social situation, a friend innocently asked “Why do kids go to religious school twice a week starting in third grade?” In both cases, these friends of mine are connected to the Jewish community and are already committed to raising Jewish kids. But they (along with many others) wonder about the value of religious school, and about the time commitment required to take part in it. Is it worth it?


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18 DIY Outdoor Games You Should Play This Summer

Mon, 07/31/2017 - 12:00am
BY RORI KOTCH for Country Living

 

Looking for some great idea to make and do with the kids?  Make your next backyard bash a hit with these DIY lawn games.


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Make This a Summer of Jewish learning!

Mon, 07/24/2017 - 12:00am
From bimbam


Watch Something Jewish


This summer, between all of the camps and trips, make sure that you take a little time to engage Jewishly with your children.  


No matter what their age, BimBam has engaging, high quality, educational content that will meet them where they are, and hopefully spark an interest in Judaism. Your child can learn about:

  • Jewish values and how to practically apply them in our Shaboom! series.
  • Holidays, rituals, and traditions in our Judaism 101 series.
  • The weekly Torah portion and other Jewish texts.

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How an Anxious Jewish Mother Became a Free-Range Parent

Mon, 07/17/2017 - 12:00am
BY CARLA NAUMBURG for Kveller


I am not built to be a free-range mother. I am anxious and over-protective by nature, and my years of experience as a social worker have only increased my awareness of everything that could happen to my daughters, from sexual abuse to traumatic brain injuries. If I had my way, my girls wouldn’t leave the house without a GPS tracking device, a helmet, a cellphone, and a Taser Jr.

And so I was as surprised as anyone when I realized I had started free-range parenting my daughters, ages 7 and 8.5. The girls will spend weekend afternoons running to the neighbors’ house, and then sometimes the other neighbors’ house, and eventually either my husband or I end up texting the other parents on the block in order to figure out where they are.

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8 Times Natalie Portman Gave the Best Advice

Mon, 07/10/2017 - 12:00am
BY JOANNA C. VALENTE for Kveller


June 9 was Natalie Portman‘s 36th birthday. The mom of two (her kids have the best Hebrew names: Aleph and Amalia) is also one of the biggest stars today, not to mention one of the most talented. Regardless of whether you are a huge fan or not, you have to admit, she’s got range; her films range from “V for Vendetta” to “Black Swan” to “Jackie” to “No Strings Attached.” And let us not forget one of her most shining moments: that profane SNL rap.

Here are some of my favorite Portman quotes in which she reveals her sassy side, how she parents, and what she stands for.

On parenting:

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How Israel Beat Peanut Allergies

Mon, 07/03/2017 - 12:00am
Dr. Eliana Aaron for The Forward


Allergy advocacy used to be easy. Given the potentially tragic consequences of anaphylactic shock, everyone assumed a simple formula: the more precautions the better. In wealthy countries like the United States, ever greater accommodations were made to ensure that allergy sufferers were separated from the foods that could do them harm. Nut-free schools went from unheard of to ubiquitous in just a few decades. It seemed that the only limits on the allergy-containment agenda were money and willpower.

Over the past decade, however, this crystal clear picture became distinctly blurry. The first blows to the confidence of allergy advocates came from studies that suggested that allergy-free zones were ineffective in keeping people safe. Instead, we learned, they were often counter-productive because allergy sufferers developed a false sense of security, while compliance with increasingly draconian restrictions was impossible to enforce. Warning signs were starting to flash up, counseling moderation in the fight against allergies. However, they were nothing compared to the bombshell revelation waiting in the Jewish state.

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